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Sciatica

  Are you suffering from back or hip pain that can radiate down your leg or calf? Is the pain worse when sitting?   You may be suffering from a condition called Sciatica. Sciatic is the pain of your sciatica nerve. The pain can be a dull ache in the lower back and hip (buttocks) that travels down the leg to the back of the knee, calf, even down to the foot. The pain can also feel like a burning sensation, shooting pain or tightness that won’t go away with treatment or rest. Sciatica is a condition that can be stubborn and difficult to treat with pain killers or other forms of complementary medicine. Acupuncture has been proved to be one of the best conservative treatment for sciatica pain. Risk Factors People at risk of suffering from Sciatica are those who have back injuries from over exertion or sports. Normally are those people who: Have manual labour jobs involving heavy lifting; Repetitive physical tasks; Sitting for long periods of time without being able to get up and walk around (e.g. driving and office jobs). Sciatica is a condition that most commonly affects men and the elderly. However it can be a problem for anyone and especially those who suffer from lower back tightness, fatigue and pain in the leg. Am I having Sciatica? Main symptoms of Sciatica are: Lower back pain or without lower back pain; Aching or burning pain in the buttock; Pain in the back of the thigh (hamstring); Pain radiated to calf, ankle and foot; Pins and needles in the buttock, hamstring, calf or foot; Increased...

Influence of acupuncture on the pregnancy rate in patients who undergo assisted reproduction therapy

One research showed acupuncture can improve pregancy rate after ART. The research is to evaluate the effect of acupuncture on the pregnancy rate in assisted reproduction therapy (ART) by comparing a group of patients receiving acupuncture treatment shortly before and after embryo transfer with a control group receiving no acupuncture. After giving informed consent, 160 patients who were undergoing ART and who had good quality embryos were divided into the following two groups through random selection: embryo transfer with acupuncture (n = 80) and embryo transfer without acupuncture (n = 80). Acupuncture was performed in 80 patients 25 minutes before and after embryo transfer. In the control group, embryos were transferred without any supportive therapy. The result showed that, the clinical pregnancies rate of each group are: in the acupuncture group: 42.5% In the control group:  26.3% The research showed that acupuncture is a useful tool for improving pregnancy rate after ART. References Paulus WE, Zhang M, Strehler E, El-Danasouri I, Sterzik K. Fertil Steril. 2002 Apr;77(4):721-4...

Acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer significantly improves the reproductive outcome in infertile women: a prospective, randomized trial

To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on reproductive outcome in patients treated with IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). One group of patients received acupuncture on the day of ET, another group on ET day and again 2 days later (i.e., closer to implantation day), and both groups were compared with a control group that did not receive acupuncture. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized trial. SETTING: Private fertility center. PATIENT(S): During the study period all patients receiving IVF or ICSI treatment were offered participation in the study. On the day of oocyte retrieval, patients were randomly allocated (with sealed envelopes) to receive acupuncture on the day of ET (ACU 1 group, n = 95), on that day and again 2 days later (ACU 2 group, n = 91), or no acupuncture (control group, n = 87). INTERVENTION(S): Acupuncture was performed immediately before and after ET (ACU 1 and 2 groups), with each session lasting 25 minutes; and one 25-minute session was performed 2 days later in the ACU 2 group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Clinical pregnancy and ongoing pregnancy rates in the three groups. RESULT(S): Clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates were significantly higher in the ACU 1 group as compared with controls (37 of 95 [39%] vs. 21 of 87 [26%] and 34 of 95 [36%] vs. 19 of 87 [22%]). The clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates in the ACU 2 group (36% and 26%) were higher than in controls, but the difference did not reach statistical difference. CONCLUSION(S): Acupuncture on the day of ET significantly improves the reproductive outcome of IVF/ICSI, compared with no acupuncture. Repeating acupuncture on ET day +2 provided no...

Electro-acupuncture shows promise for knee arthritis

A modern twist on traditional acupuncture may bring some pain relief to people with knee arthritis, at least in the short term, a small study suggests   The study, published in the journal Pain, looked at the effects of electro-acupuncture among 40 adults with knee osteoarthritis — the common “wear-and-tear” form of arthritis in which the cartilage cushioning the joints breaks down. Electro-acupuncture is similar to traditional acupuncture, where fine needles are inserted into specific points in the skin. What’s different is that the practitioner fits the needles with clips that are attached to a small device that delivers a continuous electrical impulse to stimulate the acupuncture point. Among the patients in the current study, those who had a daily electro-acupuncture session for 10 consecutive days reported greater improvement in their pain compared with patients who received a “sham” version of the therapy. Patients in that latter group received acupuncture, but the needles were inserted at random points on the skin rather than traditional acupuncture sites. And while the needles were attached to the electrical device, it was not actually turned on. The findings suggest that true electro-acupuncture may offer at least short-term pain relief to knee arthritis sufferers, according to the researchers, led by Dr. Sadia Ahsin of the Army Medical College Rawalpindi in Pakistan. Acupuncture has been used for more than 2,000 years in Chinese medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments. According to traditional medicine, specific acupuncture points on the skin are connected to internal pathways that conduct energy, or qi (“chee”), and stimulating these points with a fine needle promotes the healthy flow of...

2010 Spring News Letter

The season of change is finally here and heaven knows no one appreciates like Melbournians, I think it’s actually the reason we stay so cheery during the winter now, there a couple of things that we get as a bonus to the feeling of sun on our face and If I warn you about it now, maybe you can enjoy the change! With the sun we also get… Wind, not so affectionately referred to in Chinese Medicine as the “bearer of a hundred diseases…” demands particular respect in early spring because our protective energy, like the rest of us, is usually a little weak after winter. So, • leave your winter clothes on until well past the start of the warmer weather because the sun is out well before our environment is warm, • carry a scarf or wear a collar so you can cover your neck on windy days, it’s the area most susceptible to “wind invasion”, • if you have a history of health problems in Spring it is much easier for us to treat them before the symptoms come, And yes, I’m talking about hay fever, and asthma, and eczema or any other skin problems because it’s the skin and the Lungs that often show the first signs of an “external wind invasion”. “Stirring internal wind” is another risk of windy weather; ask the school teachers what happens to the children on windy days! Now adults are also affected, so symptoms related to the Liver function in Chinese Medicine may arise for example, insomnia, trembling hands, vertigo, migraines, some arthritic conditions and mood swings to name...