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Sciatica

  Are you suffering from back or hip pain that can radiate down your leg or calf? Is the pain worse when sitting?   You may be suffering from a condition called Sciatica. Sciatic is the pain of your sciatica nerve. The pain can be a dull ache in the lower back and hip (buttocks) that travels down the leg to the back of the knee, calf, even down to the foot. The pain can also feel like a burning sensation, shooting pain or tightness that won’t go away with treatment or rest. Sciatica is a condition that can be stubborn and difficult to treat with pain killers or other forms of complementary medicine. Acupuncture has been proved to be one of the best conservative treatment for sciatica pain. Risk Factors People at risk of suffering from Sciatica are those who have back injuries from over exertion or sports. Normally are those people who: Have manual labour jobs involving heavy lifting; Repetitive physical tasks; Sitting for long periods of time without being able to get up and walk around (e.g. driving and office jobs). Sciatica is a condition that most commonly affects men and the elderly. However it can be a problem for anyone and especially those who suffer from lower back tightness, fatigue and pain in the leg. Am I having Sciatica? Main symptoms of Sciatica are: Lower back pain or without lower back pain; Aching or burning pain in the buttock; Pain in the back of the thigh (hamstring); Pain radiated to calf, ankle and foot; Pins and needles in the buttock, hamstring, calf or foot; Increased...

Electro-acupuncture shows promise for knee arthritis

A modern twist on traditional acupuncture may bring some pain relief to people with knee arthritis, at least in the short term, a small study suggests   The study, published in the journal Pain, looked at the effects of electro-acupuncture among 40 adults with knee osteoarthritis — the common “wear-and-tear” form of arthritis in which the cartilage cushioning the joints breaks down. Electro-acupuncture is similar to traditional acupuncture, where fine needles are inserted into specific points in the skin. What’s different is that the practitioner fits the needles with clips that are attached to a small device that delivers a continuous electrical impulse to stimulate the acupuncture point. Among the patients in the current study, those who had a daily electro-acupuncture session for 10 consecutive days reported greater improvement in their pain compared with patients who received a “sham” version of the therapy. Patients in that latter group received acupuncture, but the needles were inserted at random points on the skin rather than traditional acupuncture sites. And while the needles were attached to the electrical device, it was not actually turned on. The findings suggest that true electro-acupuncture may offer at least short-term pain relief to knee arthritis sufferers, according to the researchers, led by Dr. Sadia Ahsin of the Army Medical College Rawalpindi in Pakistan. Acupuncture has been used for more than 2,000 years in Chinese medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments. According to traditional medicine, specific acupuncture points on the skin are connected to internal pathways that conduct energy, or qi (“chee”), and stimulating these points with a fine needle promotes the healthy flow of...