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Researches of Chinese Herbal Medicine and fertility

Efficacy of Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine in the management of female infertility: a systematic review.

Ried K1, Stuart K. Complement Ther Med. 2011 Dec;19(6):319-31. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2011.09.003. Epub 2011 Oct 5.

Conclusions

Review suggests that management of female infertility with Chinese Herbal Medicine can improve pregnancy rates 2-fold within a 4 month period compared with Western Medical fertility drug therapy or IVF. Assessment of the quality of the menstrual cycle, integral to TCM diagnosis, appears to be fundamental to successful treatment of female infertility.

 

 

Chinese herbal medicine for female infertility: an updated meta-analysis.

Ried K1.Complement Ther Med. 2015 Feb;23(1):116-28. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2014.12.004. Epub 2015 Jan 3.

Methods

We searched the Medline and Cochrane databases until December 2013 for randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses investigating Chinese herbal medicine therapy for female infertility and compared clinical pregnancy rates achieved with CHM versus WM drug treatment.

Results

Forty RCTs involving 4247 women with infertility were included in our systematic review. Meta-analysis suggested a 1.74 higher probability of achieving a pregnancy with CHM therapy than with WM therapy alone (risk ratio 1.74, 95%CI: 1.56-1.94; p<0.0001; odds ratio 3.14; 95%CI: 2.72-3.62; p<0.0001) in women with infertility. Trials included women with PCOS, endometriosis, anovulation, fallopian tube blockage, or unexplained infertility. Mean pregnancy rates in the CHM group were 60% compared with 33% in the WM group.

Conclusions

Our review suggests that management of female infertility with Chinese herbal medicine can improve pregnancy rates 2-fold within a 3-6 month period compared with Western medical fertility drug therapy. In addition, fertility indicators such as ovulation rates, cervical mucus score, biphasic basal body temperature, and appropriate thickness of the endometrial lining were positively influenced by CHM therapy, indicating an ameliorating physiological effect conducive for a viable pregnancy.

 

 

Unexplained Infertility Treated with Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine in Korea

Jongbae J. Park, K.M.D., Ph.D.J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Feb; 16(2): 193–198.

Conclusions

The standard therapeutic package for unexplained infertility in women studied here is safe for infants and the treated women, when administered by licensed professionals. While it remains challenging to have the target population complete a 6-month treatment course, during which most patients have to pay out of pocket, the extent of successfully achieved pregnancy in those who received full treatment provides meaningful outcomes, warranting further attention. A future study that includes subsidized treatment costs, encouraging the appropriate compliance rate, is warranted.

Treatment of Chinese Herbal Medicine for Female Infertility.

Int Rev Neurobiol. 2017;135:233-247. doi: 10.1016/bs.irn.2017.02.011. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Jiang D1, Li L2, Zeng BY3

1 Hallam Institution of TCM in Sheffield UK, Sheffield, United Kingdom. Electronic address: djiang52@hotmail.com.

2 St. Mary’s Hospital Paddington, London, United Kingdom.

3 Neurodegenerative Disease Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King’s College, London, United Kingdom.

 

Abstract

Female infertility is when a woman of reproductive age and sexual active, without contraception, cannot get pregnant after a year and more or keeps having miscarriages. Although conventional treatments for infertility such as hormone therapy, in vitro fertilization and many more, helped many female patients with infertility get pregnant during past a few decades, it is far from satisfactory with prolonging treatment time frames and emotional and financial burden. In recent years, more patients with infertile problems are seeking to alternative and complementary medicines to achieve a better outcome. In particular, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is increasingly popular for treating infertility due to its effectiveness and complimentary with conventional treatments. However, the mechanisms of action of CHM in treating female infertility are not well understood. In this chapter authors reviewed research development of CHM applied in many infertile models and CHM clinical studies in many conditions associated with female infertility, published in past 15 years. The data of review showed that CHM has either specific target mechanisms of action or multitarget mechanisms of action, via regulating relevant hormone levels in female reproductive system, improving ovary function, enhancing uterine receptivity. More studies are warranted to explore the new drugs from CHM and ensure safety, efficacy, and consistency of CHM.

Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine on Male Infertility

Jiang D1, Coscione A2, Li L3, Zeng BY4

1 Hallam Institution of TCM in Sheffield UK, Sheffield, United Kingdom. Email: djiang52@hotmail.com.

2 The Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, Harlow, United Kingdom.

3 St Mary’s Hospital Paddington, London, United Kingdom.

4 Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, King’s College, London, United Kingdom.

 

Abstract

Male infertility normally refers a male’s inability to cause pregnancy in a fertile female partner after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Male infertility in recent years has been attracting increasing interest from public due to the evidence in decline in semen quality. There are many factors contributing to the male infertility including abnormal spermatogenesis; reproductive tract anomalies or obstruction; inadequate sexual and ejaculatory functions; and impaired sperm motility, imbalance in hormone levels, and immune system dysfunction. Although conventional treatments such as medication, surgical operation, and advanced techniques have helped many male with infertility cause pregnancy in their female partners, effectiveness is not satisfactory and associated with adverse effects. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been used to improve male infertility in China for a very long time and has now been increasingly popular in Western countries for treating infertility. In this chapter we summarized recent development in basic research and clinical studies of CHM in treating male infertility. It has showed that CHM improved sperm motility and quality, increased sperm count and rebalanced inadequate hormone levels, and adjusted immune functions leading to the increased number of fertility. Further, CHM in combination with conventional therapies improved efficacy of conventional treatments. More studies are needed to indentify the new drugs from CHM and ensure safety, efficacy, and consistency of CHM.

Recurrent miscarriage–outcome after supportive care in early pregnancy

coverLiddell HS et al, Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 1991 Nov;31(4):320-2.

This study did not use acupuncture or herbs, but it is interested to include it here as a way of managing early pregnancy in women who have had previous miscarriages. There is currently no known prevention therapy for unexplained recurrent miscarriage, but this study showed that emotional support and close supervision helped improve outcomes in subsequent pregnancies.

 

Abstract

One hundred and thirty three couples were investigated at a recurrent miscarriage clinic. In their next pregnancy 42 women (Group 1) with unexplained recurrent miscarriage were managed with a programme of formal emotional support and close supervision at an early pregnancy clinic. Two women were seen in 2 pregnancies (44 supervised pregnancies); 86% (38 of 44) of these pregnancies were successful. Four of the 6 miscarriages had an identifiable causal factor. Nine women (Group 2), also with unexplained recurrent miscarriage, acted as a control group. After initial investigation they were reassured and returned to the care of their family practitioner and did not receive formal supportive care in their subsequent pregnancy; 33% (3 of 9) of these pregnancies were successful (p = 0.005; Fishers Exact Test). Whilst acknowledging that there is a significant spontaneous cure rate in this condition, emotional support seems to be important in the prevention of unexplained recurrent miscarriage, giving results as good as any currently accepted therapy.

Effect of Quyu Jiedu Granule (祛瘀解毒颗粒) on Micro environment of Ova in Patients with Endometriosis

Acupuncture-Pregnancy-369

Lian Fang et al, Zhong Xi Yi He Xue Bao 2009 Feb;15(1):42-46 Chinese Journal of Integrated Medicine

A chinese herb formula for endometriosis was given to women with  long term infertility and endometriosis before and during an IVF cycle and various ovarian parameters were compared with a group of women with endometriosis who embarked on IVF directly without taking the herbs. The group who took the herbs produced more eggs and had a higher fertilisation rate (although a difference in pregnancy rate was not reported). Additionally the follicles of the women who took the herbs showed a reduced level of inflammatory cytokines compared to the women in the control group.

 

Abstract

Objective

To observe the effect of Quyu Jiedu Granules (QJG) on the microenvironment of ova in patients with endometriosis (EM).

 

Methods

Twenty EM patients who received in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) were randomized equally into a treated group and a control group.Further, 20 patients who received IVF-ET due to oviduct factors were enrolled into a non-endometriosis group.The dosage of gonadotrophic hormone used, the number of ova attained, fertilization rate and clinical pregnancy rate were all observed, and the levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in follicular fluid as well as their mRNA expressions in ovarian granular cells were detected by RT-PCR on the very day of ovum attainment.

 

Results

The ova attainment (13.80±6.87) and fertilization rate (0.69±0.31) in the treated group were all higher than the corresponding values in the control group (9.80±5.32 and 0.47±0.22); the follicular fluid contents of TNF-α and IL-6 in the treated group were 1.38±0.21 ng/mL and 130.56±12.81 pg/mL, respectively, which were lower than those in the control group (1.98±0.34 ng/mL and 146.83±17.65 pg/mL, respectively). Further, the treated group showed much lower mRNA expressions of TNF-α and IL-6 in ovarian granular cells.

 

Conclusions

The elevation of TNF-α and IL-6 contents in follicular fluid and their mRNA expressions in ovarian granular cells are possibly related to the low quality of ova in EM; QJG might raise the ova quality by reducing TNF-α and IL-6 levels to improve the living micro-environment for the ova.