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Back pain stretching exercises

Back pain stretching exercises

If you have lower back pain, here are the back pain stretching exercises that I recommend you do daily. Back pain stretching exercises All stretches are to be performed while lying on a flat firm surface,  such as the floor. Lying on the bed is ok, however you do not have enough support as lying on the floor.   Stretch one – Bring the knees up Lying on your back, have one leg out straight as you bring the other knee up to the chest with both hands. Hold for at least 10 breaths. Repeat on the other leg. Bring both knees up to the chest and hold for at least 10 breath   Stretch two – Rolling side to side Place both feet on the ground with knees bent, stretch both arms out to the sides and gently roll the knees from side to side twenty times (ten times each side)   Stretch three – Cross your knee Keeping both hands stretched out to the sides, place one leg out straight and lift the other knee up in line with your hip, gently take it across to the opposite side using your hand to pull it down. While pulling the knee down look to the opposite side, hold for at least 10 breaths and then repeat with the other leg.   How many back pain stretches exercises should I do? Doing all those three stretches counts as one set.   How often should I do the stretches? In each session you should aim for a minimum of three sets. You should perform the whole routine at least twice...

How to Record Your Basal Body Temperature (BBT)

How to Record Your Basal Body Temperature (BBT) Before taking your temperature, a minimum of 3 hours consecutive sleep must have been had. If you use a glass thermometer, shake it down the day before. Take your daily temperature straight away when you wake up (before any other activity such as going to the bathroom.) Record you temperature soon after it is taken. Try to take it at the same time each day, when you wake up (instead of getting up). Make dots or cross on the appropriate temperature and connect the dots with straight lines. If the temperature falls between two numbers on a glass thermometer, always take the lowest. Most digital thermometers keep the temperature on it until the next use. Note events such as stress, or illness in the Others row. Temperatures taken late should be noted in the time taken...

Menopause

  Why is menopause treated like a disease, when in fact it’s a naturally occurring process?   Menopause is a natural, physiological cycle that occurs in all women. Conventional medical treatments only address various symptoms and signs associated with menopause. However, symptoms and signs are just one part of the whole picture. Menopause Chinese medicine view Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine understand that symptoms and signs are merely indications of an imbalance deep within the body. It focuses on correcting underlying imbalances that have occurred over the years. These imbalances, if left unchecked, will result in a variety of symptoms and signs. Acupuncture and woman’s natural process Menopause signifies “a change” within a woman’s life. This change occurs because a woman’s body chemistry is shifting. Chinese medicine recognises this chemistry change as a natural process. Oestrogen is similar to what acupuncturists call Jing Qi. Jing Qi is like a gift that is given to all of us at the time of conception. It is the battery that provides us with the basic energy to power all our life functions. When Jing Qi is abundant, our ability to adapt to disease, illness and stress is optimal. As we age, our supply of Jing Qi energy is slowly drained. Generally, Jing Qi naturally begins to decline between the ages of 35 to 60, although some people drain it faster than others. When Jing Qi declines, the Organ Systems within our body become unbalanced. This leads to various symptoms and signs, such as greying hair, loss of libido, weakness of knees, urinary difficulty, poor memory, backache and fatigue. How Jing Qi can be...

Why I believe in a four month pre-conception baby making plan

Why I believe in a four month pre-conception baby making plan By Emma Cannon modified by AWC For a long time I worked with a three month pre-conception preparation cycle which was very successful. Part of the thinking behind it was that sperm take seventy-two to eighty-six days to develop in a process called spermogenesis, and I still advocate a three month plan for men. After consulting both patients and colleagues, however I decided that four months was a better preparation period for women, time and age allowing. This was for two reasons. First of all, four months (or 120 days) is the time it takes for the eggs to become more mature in the ovaries. This process is called folliculogenesis. I decided that working with the body’s natural cycle would be a better way of achieving optimum fertility health. This was backed up by anecdotal evidence from patients who chose to work a four-month cycle, they had a much high rate of positive outcomes and reported feeling even better in their ‘overall wellbeing’. Second, I have always believed that most fertility journeys are very linear. Often women have no cohesive plan and when thing don’t happen as they expect they feel out of control. This is why a plan of action is good; it really helps to manage the stress and make the process feel more fun and enjoyable. In my practise, I put my patients into a cycle of treatment that has a beginning, middle and an end; this lasts four months. It is far more reassuring that the stop-start approaches that distresses so many women who...

Pre-menstrual Tension (PMS)

  What is Pre-menstrual Tension (PMS)? Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) is often viewed as a “problem” or illness. It’s not. Instead, PMS is a variety of responses to an ordinary event in women’s lives: menstruation. PMS usually occurs monthly, accompanied with specific symptoms and signs that can appear seven to ten days before menstruation and then disappear after the onset of the menstrual flow. To better understand PMS, it is important to look at the whole picture. What causes Pre-menstrual Tension (PMS)? Although PMS is due to unbalanced hormonal fluctuations, other factors such as stress, a nutritionally inadequate diet, lack of exercise and sleep, and a hectic or sedentary lifestyle can exacerbate the symptoms. Because of most women exhibit as many as four to ten symptoms one to two weeks prior to menstruation, their lives – from relationships with family and friends, to work productivity and the ability to appreciate and take pleasure in their own bodies – may become diminished.   Risk To make matters worse, women may be at increased risk for PMS if 1) they are over 30 years old; 2) they are experiencing significant amount of stress; 3) their nutritional habits are poor; 4) they have suffered side effects, from birth control pills; 5) they have difficulty maintaining a stable weight; 6) they do not get enough exercise; 7) they have had children (the more children, the more severe the symptoms, or 8) they have a family history of depression.   Common PMS symptoms & signs:   Acne Allergies Anxiety appetite changes Backache Bloating Breast tenderness & swelling Constipation and/or diarrhoea Cramps Depression Edema Headache/Migraine Heart palpitation...